Michael McCue on Town Administration, Master’s Degrees, and Gingko Biloba Saplings

Michael McCue
Photo from SippicanVillageSoup.com

Avid Portraits readers may have noticed an entry in the Alumni News section about former history major Michael McCue ‘89.  The story piqued our interest, so One Thing After Another contacted Michael to learn more.

Q:  You are currently the Town Administrator in Rochester, Massachusetts. What does a Town Administrator do?

A: As the former Town Administrator in Avon and the current Town Administrator in Rochester, I supervise all aspects of the daily functioning of the community. This includes overseeing weekly expenditures and payroll, handling citizens’ concerns, and interacting with department heads as well as local, state and federal officials. No day is the same.

Q:  Recently, you arranged to have gingko biloba saplings planted in Avon through a United Nations Program.  The saplings were cuttings from a tree that survived the bombing of Hiroshima, Japan in 1945.  What made you want to bring those saplings to Avon?  What do they mean to you or the town?

A: I started an Arbor Day observation in the Town of Avon about four years ago to help the Town achieve designation as an Arbor Day Foundation “Tree City USA.” This included a partnership with National Grid to donate and plant trees in public spaces each spring. I was looking for 2014’s trees when I came across the ginkgo and learned of its hardiness for street-scapes. It was then I learned that there were 170 trees that had survived the Hiroshima bombing (which killed over 100,000 people) and that a UN-supported foundation existed that spreads the gingko saplings worldwide.  I reached out to them, struck up a friendship, and received 12 saplings this spring.  They come from a 250-year-old tree that was 1500 yards from the blast.

Those interested in reading more about Green Legacy and “A-bombed” trees can check out http://www.unitar.org/sites/default/files/glh_-_revised_infornation_note_oct_2012.pdf

Q:  Clearly trees matter to you!

A: I am an avid gardener and tree advocate (but not a “tree-hugger”). I ensured in a recent demolition of a building in Avon that a 40+ year-old apple tree on the grounds was spared.

Q:  What would you say to history majors thinking about careers–do you recommend your path of an MA in Public Administration?

A: I would strongly recommend seeking a graduate degree in Public Administration (or any advanced degree) as soon as one decides on that course. I went back to school almost ten years after graduating from St. A’s and feel that had I done so sooner, I would have been much better off. But then again, maybe I wasn’t ready to return to school. If one were to undertake the commitment to a graduate degree one must be ready to put in the effort (such courses are much more expensive) and perhaps I wasn’t at the right point for that.  I would stress that in choosing a program a student find one that focuses on practical applications of what is learned and features instructors who have worked in the field.

Q:  What do you like to do when you aren’t working?  Is a Town Administrator ever able to just watch his kid play baseball or enjoy a local restaurant,or do you always have to be ready to answer work related questions when you are in town?

A: Actually, I was writing freelance history articles for American and Canadian history magazines like Military History and American History, as well as several newspapers in both countries. I also took several years, prior to the online sites, to research my family tree back to the Mayflower and beyond. However, the role of Town Administrator is quite demanding, requiring a few night meetings each week.   That said, I always found the time to attend my son’s baseball games and cub scout meetings (he doesn’t do either any more) and currently my daughter’s soccer games.

I do not live in the town in which I work. It is not a requirement, though there are a few towns that do (including Mansfield, the town in which I currently live). I am not a big fan of residency requirements, for the reasons to which you allude above.

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